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Sea Ports in Africa

Though there are quite a good number of Sea Ports in Africa, this post covers our Top Sea Ports in Africa and the reasons which one you should channel your shipments to as well as why. As one of the best freight forwarding companies in Lagos, Nigeria, Bowagate Global Limited aims to equip while guiding her clients on what’s best decisions to take in the course of shipping goods internationally.

You are more likely particular with Sea Ports as pertaining to ports located on the shore of a sea or ocean. These ports are normally operated by the federal government. Sea Ports may also be classified according to their location and type of cargo handled.

Top Sea Ports in Africa

The continent of Africa has a long history of being cut off from the rest of the world. However, in recent years, there have been many improvements in both the type and quantity of ports that service this region.

The continent of Africa is a melting pot of different countries, cultures and people. It is also one of the fastest-growing regions in terms of trade and industry with an ever-expanding middle class. Accordingly, it is not surprising that increased trade on the continent is resulting in a number of new ports being constructed to facilitate this growth.

We’ve put together a list of my personal favourite African ports We’ll also explain how these ports can be improved to better serve the people and businesses in the region.

The maritime sector accounts for most of Africa’s GDP, with over 90% of the continent’s imports and exports transported by sea to international trade.

Even though port operations face numerous challenges across Africa, there are still numerous opportunities in African ports. The following is a list of Africa’s top ports. We also prepared a few reasons why they made a list.

Nigeria’s Lagos Port, Apapa

It is well-known for its bustling environments and expansion into other landlocked countries. The Port of Apapa Container Terminal has six berths and a 6.5 thousand square meters covered storage area. The container yard has a capacity of 1.4 million TEU and 298 reefer plugs.

The first container terminal was built in the early 1970s. It was officially opened on January 1, 1973, by the then military ruler, Gen. Yakubu Gowon. Containers were brought by rail from Lagos, some 500 kilometres away.

Container Terminal 2, which is operated by the Federal Government of Nigeria, has four berths and a 3.2 thousand square meters covered storage area. The container yard has a capacity of 1.4 million TEU and 165 reefer plugs.

The third container terminal is operated by the Lagos State Government and has three berths and a 2.5 thousand square meters covered storage area. The container yard has a capacity of 1.4 million TEU and 130 reefer plugs.

Port Said, Egypt

Port Said is a busy passenger port. It has four passenger terminals, with three of them having the capacity to handle cruise ships. The fourth terminal is used for ferry service to destinations in Egypt and neighbouring countries. Port Said’s ferry terminal has been recently renovated and expanded.

Port Said has a container capacity of approximately 3.1 million. Each year, Port Said handles approximately 15 million tons of cargo on vessels with a draft of 13 meters. Port Said is home to a Dry Bulk Terminal comprised of combined silos and warehouses capable of storing approximately two million tons. The Container Terminal is equipped with eight berths. The terminal is capable of handling 700,000 TEUs.

The Port Said Naval Base is the headquarters of the Egyptian Navy’s Mediterranean fleet. The base was established in 1937 when Egypt was still under British rule. It was originally built to protect the Suez Canal from naval attacks.

Port Durban, South Africa

Port Durban is strategically significant due to its proximity to the Far East, the Middle East, Australasia, South America, North America, and Europe. Durban Port handles 60% of all containers handled at all South African ports. It is commonly called Durban Harbour, is the largest and busiest shipping terminal in sub-Saharan Africa.

With a capacity of approximately 1.55 million containers, 31.4 million tons of cargo per year, and on-record handling of 4.7 million TEUs in 2019, the Port can handle a staggering 4.7 million TEUs. The Port of Durban is one of the busiest ports in the world, and the second-largest container port in South Africa. It is also one of the most important seaports on the African continent.

Durban Port has a major role to play in the development of South Africa and is also a key player in the growth of other African countries.

The Port of Durban has been in operation since 1881 when it was first used as a harbour for the export of coal. In 1887, the Port was declared a free port, and the city began to grow rapidly.

The first rail link between Durban and Johannesburg was established in 1895, and this increased the importance of the Port of Durban as a link between the sea and inland areas.

Reference: Port of Durban on Wikipedia.

Port Tanger, Tanger Med, Morocco

By capacity, the Port is the largest in the Mediterranean and Africa. The Port was upgraded in 2019 to handle 9 million TEUs, up from 3.5 million, and is now ranked as the world’s 37th largest Port.

Nigeria’s Apapa Port

It is well-known for its bustling environments and expansion into other landlocked countries. The Port of Apapa Container Terminal has six berths and a 6.5 thousand square meters covered storage area. The container yard has a capacity of 1.4 million TEU and 298 reefer plugs.

Port Abidjan, Ivory Coast

Abidjan’s Port is one of the largest in West Africa. The Port is mostly used as a transshipment point to West and Central Africa. Its use as a transshipment point accounts for approximately 80% of its customs revenues. The cocoa trade’s vitality is critical for Côte d’Ivoire, the world’s third-largest exporter of cocoa beans, and West Africa. It provides a 1.5 million TEU annual container capacity.

Port Mombasa, Kenya

The Port of Mombasa serves as the entry and exit point for cargo from Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, South Sudan, Somalia, and Ethiopia. The Port can handle 1.4 million TEUs. Additionally, it is the busiest Port in East & Central Africa, with an annual growth rate of approximately 10% in cargo throughput. It ranks among Africa’s top ten fastest-growing container ports.

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